PROVE IT WRONG OR PASS IT ON

PROVE IT WRONG OR PASS IT ON BannerFans.com

BE THIS GUY

BE THIS GUY
August Landmesser, Hamburg Shipyard Worker Who Refused To Make Nazi Salute

Friday, November 12, 2010

Ted Koppel: Olbermann, O'Reilly and the death of real news

Ted Koppel: Olbermann, O'Reilly and the death of real news


Back then, a policy against political contributions would have aimed to avoid even the appearance of partisanship. But today, when Olbermann draws more than 1 million like-minded viewers to his program every night precisely because he is avowedly, unabashedly and monotonously partisan, it is not clear what misdemeanor his donations constituted. Consistency?


We live now in a cable news universe that celebrates the opinions of Olbermann, Rachel Maddow, Chris Matthews, Glenn Beck, Sean Hannity and Bill O'Reilly - individuals who hold up the twin pillars of political partisanship and who are encouraged to do so by their parent organizations because their brand of analysis and commentary is highly profitable.


The commercial success of both MSNBC and Fox News is a source of nonpartisan sadness for me. While I can appreciate the financial logic of drowning television viewers in a flood of opinions designed to confirm their own biases, the trend is not good for the republic. It is, though, the natural outcome of a growing sense of national entitlement. Daniel Patrick Moynihan's oft-quoted observation that "everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not his own facts," seems almost quaint in an environment that flaunts opinions as though they were facts.




And so, among the many benefits we have come to believe the founding fathers intended for us, the latest is news we can choose. Beginning, perhaps, from the reasonable perspective that absolute objectivity is unattainable, Fox News and MSNBC no longer even attempt it. They show us the world not as it is, but as partisans (and loyal viewers) at either end of the political spectrum would like it to be. This is to journalism what Bernie Madoff was to investment: He told his customers what they wanted to hear, and by the time they learned the truth, their money was gone.


It is also part of a pervasive ethos that eschews facts in favor of an idealized reality. The fashion industry has known this for years. A recent investigative report by Esquire magazine found that men's jeans from a variety of name-brand manufacturers are cut large but labeled small. The actual waist sizes are tailored anywhere from three to six inches roomier than their labels insist.


Perhaps it doesn't matter that we are being flattered into believing what any full-length mirror can tell us is untrue. But when our accountants, bankers and lawyers, our doctors and our politicians tell us only what we want to hear, despite hard evidence to the contrary, we are headed for disaster. We need only look at our housing industry, our credit card debt, the cost of two wars subsidized by borrowed money, and the rising deficit to understand the dangers of entitlement run rampant. We celebrate truth as a virtue, but only in the abstract. What we really need in our search for truth is a commodity that used to be at the heart of good journalism: facts - along with a willingness to present those facts without fear or favor.


To the degree that broadcast news was a more virtuous operation 40 years ago, it was a function of both fear and innocence. Network executives were afraid that a failure to work in the "public interest, convenience and necessity," as set forth in the Radio Act of 1927, might cause the Federal Communications Commission to suspend or even revoke their licenses. The three major broadcast networks pointed to their news divisions (which operated at a loss or barely broke even) as evidence that they were fulfilling the FCC's mandate. News was, in a manner of speaking, the loss leader that permitted NBC, CBS and ABC to justify the enormous profits made by their entertainment divisions.


On the innocence side of the ledger, meanwhile, it never occurred to the network brass that news programming could be profitable.


Until, that is, CBS News unveiled its "60 Minutes" news magazine in 1968. When, after three years or so, "60 Minutes" turned a profit (something no television news program had previously achieved), a light went on, and the news divisions of all three networks came to be seen as profit centers, with all the expectations that entailed.


I recall a Washington meeting many years later at which Michael Eisner, then the chief executive of Disney, ABC's parent company, took questions from a group of ABC News correspondents and compared our status in the corporate structure to that of the Disney artists who create the company's world-famous cartoons. (He clearly and sincerely intended the analogy to flatter us.) Even they, Eisner pointed out, were expected to make budget cuts; we would have to do the same.


I mentioned several names to Eisner and asked if he recognized any. He did not. They were, I said, ABC correspondents and cameramen who had been killed or wounded while on assignment. While appreciating the enormous talent of the corporation's cartoonists, I pointed out that working on a television crew, covering wars, revolutions and natural disasters, was different. The suggestion was not well received.


The parent companies of all three networks would ultimately find a common way of dealing with the risk and expense inherent in operating news bureaus around the world: They would eliminate them. Peter Jennings and I, who joined ABC News within a year of each other in the early 1960s, were profoundly influenced by our years as foreign correspondents. When we became the anchors and managing editors of our respective programs, we tried to make sure foreign news remained a major ingredient. It was a struggle.


Peter called me one afternoon in the mid-'90s to ask whether we at "Nightline" had been receiving the same inquiries that he and his producers were getting at "World News Tonight." We had, indeed, been getting calls from company bean-counters wanting to know how many times our program had used a given overseas bureau in the preceding year. This data in hand, the accountants constructed the simplest of equations: Divide the cost of running a bureau by the number of television segments it produced. The cost, inevitably, was deemed too high to justify leaving the bureau as it was. Trims led to cuts and, in most cases, to elimination.

The networks say they still maintain bureaus around the world, but whereas in the 1960s I was one of 20 to 30 correspondents working out of fully staffed offices in more than a dozen major capitals, for the most part, a "bureau" now is just a local fixer who speaks English and can facilitate the work of a visiting producer or a correspondent in from London.


Much of the American public used to gather before the electronic hearth every evening, separate but together, while Walter Cronkite, Chet Huntley, David Brinkley, Frank Reynolds and Howard K. Smith offered relatively unbiased accounts of information that their respective news organizations believed the public needed to know. The ritual permitted, and perhaps encouraged, shared perceptions and even the possibility of compromise among those who disagreed.


It was an imperfect, untidy little Eden of journalism where reporters were motivated to gather facts about important issues. We didn't know that we could become profit centers. No one had bitten into that apple yet.


The transition of news from a public service to a profitable commodity is irreversible. Legions of new media present a vista of unrelenting competition. Advertisers crave young viewers, and these young viewers are deemed to be uninterested in hard news, especially hard news from abroad. This is felicitous, since covering overseas news is very expensive. On the other hand, the appetite for strongly held, if unsubstantiated, opinion is demonstrably high. And such talk, as they say, is cheap.


Broadcast news has been outflanked and will soon be overtaken by scores of other media options. The need for clear, objective reporting in a world of rising religious fundamentalism, economic interdependence and global ecological problems is probably greater than it has ever been. But we are no longer a national audience receiving news from a handful of trusted gatekeepers; we're now a million or more clusters of consumers, harvesting information from like-minded providers.


As you may know, Olbermann returned to his MSNBC program after just two days of enforced absence. (Given cable television's short attention span, two days may well have seemed like an "indefinite suspension.") He was gracious about the whole thing, acknowledging at least the historical merit of the rule he had broken: "It's not a stupid rule," he said. "It needs to be adapted to the realities of 21st-century journalism."


There is, after all, not much of a chance that 21st-century journalism will be adapted to conform with the old rules. Technology and the market are offering a tantalizing array of channels, each designed to fill a particular niche - sports, weather, cooking, religion - and an infinite variety of news, prepared and seasoned to reflect our taste, just the way we like it. As someone used to say in that bygone era, "That's the way it is."
 -Ted Koppel, who was managing editor of ABC's "Nightline" from 1980 to 2005, is a contributing analyst for "BBC World News America."

No comments:

ALL TIME - Most Popular Posts

Secrets Hidden In Plain Sight

Theory of EVERYTHING: GOD, Devils, Dimensions, Dragons, Illusion & Reali...

Loading...

A Lamp In The Dark - Enter The Jesuits

USE YOUR HEAD & OPEN YOUR EYES

USE YOUR HEAD & OPEN YOUR EYES
This is the truth...

Julian Assange

Julian Assange
"Courage is Contagious."

Milton William Cooper PREDICTED 9/11

Milton William  Cooper PREDICTED 9/11
CLICK PHOTO FOR MORE: Milton William Cooper. Naval Intelligence Officer, UFO believer and conspiracy intel expert. Shot and killed in the 3rd attempt on his life. He had only one leg from an earlier attempt. His life was conveniently taken less than a month after September 11th, 2001 after he predicted it and Osama Bin-Laden as the scapegoat. Bill Clinton called him "the most dangerous man on radio". His book "Behold a Pale Horse" proves he was on to something that got him murdered. He was a true American patriot and spoke truths of things he could prove, not rumors that he heard. His research is a valuable beginning to understanding that everything you have been taught is a lie, what you thought you knew, you don't know anything about.

It just takes one...

It just takes one...
ONE MAN WITH COURAGE IS A MAJORITY

Quotes:

"Do not fear your enemies, The worst they can do is kill you. Do not fear your friends, At worst, they may betray you. Fear those who do not care, They neither kill nor betray, but betrayal and murder exists because of their silent consent"

-Bruno Jasienski


If you're not confused, you're not paying attention.


-
Tom Peters



Good character is more to be praised than outstanding talent. Most talents are, to some extent, a gift. Good character, by contrast, is not given to us. We have to build it, piece by piece -- by thought, choice, courage, and determination.

-
H. Jackson Brown


This I believe: That the free, exploring mind of the individual human is the most valuable thing in the world. And this I would fight for: the freedom of the mind to take any direction it wishes, undirected. And this I must fight against: any idea, religion, or government which limits or destroys the individual.

-
John Steinbeck

‎"Those who would give up essential liberty to purchase temporary safety, deserve neither liberty or safety."

-Benjamin Franklin



Character is like a tree and reputation like a shadow. The shadow is what we think of it; the tree is the real thing.

-
Abraham Lincoln

"I don't want a nation of thinkers, I want a nation of workers."
- John D. Rockefeller, (1839-1937)


One who asks a question is a fool for five minutes; one who does not ask a question remains a fool forever.

- Chinese Proverb

Thanks for taking the time to read this.

Prove it wrong or pass it on..., DO SOMETHING.


IF VOTING REALLY CHANGED ANYTHING, IT WOULD ALREADY BE ILLEGAL.


“Most charities are public relations for the rich, a scam on the middle class, and a disservice to the poor.”

--NL

Put not your trust in the donkey or the elephant, but in the Lamb.

O-bamanation - WE ARE BUILDING A RELIGION

O-bamanation - WE ARE BUILDING A RELIGION
"Out of MANY, we are ONE." Is this the new "Messiah"? People are comparing Barack Obama to Jesus Christ

George Orwell's warning to us in 1984 coming true.

George Orwell's warning to us in 1984 coming true.
"One Nation, Under a New Obama Salute"

CLICK PICTURE FOR EYE OPENING VIDEO

CLICK PICTURE FOR EYE OPENING VIDEO
WE ARE BUILDING A RELIGION

9/11 Ripple Effect

SHEEP TASTE LIKE CHICKEN

SHEEP TASTE LIKE CHICKEN
Visit Search For Truth's TOP CONSPIRACY SITES

The NEVER ENDING War on Terrorism

The NEVER ENDING War on Terrorism
This means NEVER-ENDING FUNDING and ENDLESS ways to take your rights away from you, dissolve the U.S. Constitution and pillage other nations.

Federal Reserve Bandits

Federal Reserve Bandits

Herbert W. Armstrong

Herbert W. Armstrong
A Voice Crying Out in the Wilderness. Mr. Armstrong - Pioneer for the 20th Century Church of God, he began the modern day true teachings of Christ and spread the true Gospel, the same one Jesus taught- that of a World Tomorrow. He taught peace, love and a better way to live. His early revival of God's message, the true Sabbath, the annual Holy Days and the pagan teachings of Christianity in Christmas, Easter...etc., gave those preaching the Word of Jesus today a guideline for the Bible and the prophecies of troubling times ahead.

Think your vote counts? You're not paying attention!

Sir, YOU ARE A LIAR!

Welcome to a NEW WORLD ORDER.

You Ready For This?

Julian Assange interview - 60 Minutes

Esoteric Agenda (FULL LENGTH)

Comprehensive Look into the Myths Surrounding the Events of 9/11

From Evolutionist to Creationist - Walter Veith

From Evolutionist to Creationist - Walter Veith
This is the testimony of Walter Veith, a South African Professor of Biology. Walter Veith did not grow up as a Christian, but through a number of amazing encounters, he came to a knowledge of the reality of God, and how wonderful He is.

Hungry In America

Hungry In America
Hungry Children in America Bringing attention to the children living in poverty that go hungry in America. Encouraging charity — your support through the many choices available — such as making a donation, volunteerism, or sponsorship of a child in the US. Today, please help a child that is Hungry In America.

Banksy

Banksy

Enjoy the simplicity

Enjoy the simplicity
...OF THE TRUTH

Gas Prices Daily

The past present and future of America...and the world.

"Our rulers can have authority over such natural rights only as we have submitted to them. The rights of conscience we never submitted, we can not submit. I have ever thought religion a concern, purely between our God and our consciences, for which we were accountable to him and not to the priests. For it is in our lives and not from our words that our religion must be read. But this does not satisfy the priesthood. They must have a positive, a declared ascent to all their interested absurdities. My opinion is that there would never have been an infedel, if there had never been a priest."

-
Thomas Jefferson

Fascism in American Political Culture

Fascism in American Political Culture
Notice the two Fasci under each arm of President Lincoln. These Fasci (the universal sign of fascism) are everywhere if you look. They're on the back of a dime, on the walls of congress and here. WHY? I decided to find the real meaning behind it and found it terrifying. I hope you look into it for yourself and pass on what you learn. Etymology The term fascismo is derived from the Italian word fascio, which means "bundle" or group, and from the Latin word fasces. The fasces, which consisted of a bundle of rods that were tied around an axe, was an ancient Roman symbol of the authority of the civic magistrate. They were carried by his lictors and could be used for corporal and capital punishment at his command. The word fascismo also relates to political organizations in Italy known as fasci, groups similar to guilds or syndicates. The symbolism of the fasces suggested strength through unity: a single rod is easily broken, while the bundle is difficult to break. Similar symbols were developed by different fascist movements. For example the Falange symbol is a bunch of arrows joined together by a yoke.